24 July 2006: Remembering Major Taylor – the fastest man on the planet

In this week’s show we remember ‘Major’ Marshall Taylor, a world champion cyclist from the 1890s and the first black American sports superstar. Kieron Yates talks about Major Taylor’s life with Lynne Tolman of the Major Taylor Association. We also ride the 2006 Etape Du Tour with Alex Murray.

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  • Anonymous

    Fabulous to have the show back in the regular rotation. Thanks, Jack.

    Speaking of bicycle radio, BBC 4 currently has an interesting programme on cycling in London and elsewhere. I missed the first in the series, but just caught the 2nd…and am now looking forward to the 3rd…
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/fallandriseofthebicycle/pip/xoowg/
    shorter link:
    http://tinyurl.com/ptong

    Info on upcoming show (available next monday)…
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/fallandriseofthebicycle/
    shorter link:
    http://tinyurl.com/mqkkt

    -Eric
    Boston, USA

  • Eric, Boston, USA

    A recent article in the Boston Globe provides more interesting history about Major Taylor (with a brief mention of a crazy uphill time-trial challenge held every year in Worcester, Massachusetts).
    http://tinyurl.com/qj83t

  • http://ratbaggy.blogspot.com/ Dave Riley

    Jack,

    You’ll appeciate this radio documentary:

    Hubert Opperman was the greatest Australian endurance cyclist ever and a minister in the Menzies and Holt federal governments. Little known in Australia, he was hugely popular in France and is the only Australian ever to be voted European Sportsman of the Year.

    He began cycling in Melton, Victoria and moved to Melbourne, where he was a telegram delivery boy, racing trams on his bike. He made his mark as a cyclist in his late teens and entered the Tour de France in 1928. With only four team members, the Australian team came 17th, against European teams of ten cyclists. He went on to be the only Australian to win the Bol D’Or and the Paris-Brest-Paris race. For his feats, his ability to break records and his overcoming of difficult odds the French public adored him and called him The Phenomenon.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/stories/2006/1699291.htm

  • Jack

    Thanks Eric, thanks Dave. I’ll be sure to give those a listen.

    Jack